Overview


Washington Wine Report is an independent publication focused on bringing Northwest wine to you and bringing you to Northwest wine. Our goal is:
  • To help you select Pacific Northwest wines at a variety of price levels
  • To keep you up-to-date about the Northwest’s wineries, vineyards, and individuals
  • To help you plan trips to wine country
  • To connect you to the larger wine community

Search

Loading...

'14 Tour Guide

Reviewed Wineries

2010 Harvest Report - October 6th Edition

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

The 2010 harvest is underway in Washington State. Over the coming weeks, I will provide weekly updates on what is picked, where, and when. See previous reports here.

10/6 Update: The 2010 Washington harvest is now a race against the clock. After an unseasonably warm ten-day stretch that quickened the pace of ripening after a cool growing season, sub-30 degree temperatures are forecast in the Yakima Valley in mid-October. This has led to some concerns about how long the growing season will last. However, the warm temperatures over the last ten days have mitigated many of the concerns that numerous varieties throughout large areas of the state would not reach maturity before freezing temperatures arrived.

Jay DeWitt of Dumas Station Winery and Minnick Hills Vineyard says of the recent warm weather, “The post-veraison weather has been unusually kind. The daily temperature range, relative humidity, and sunlight hours have been nearly ideal for ripening. This was true for the past week, and the weather forecast for next ten days looks good. I am now confident that we will get nearly all of the grapes ripe.” This was far from certain even two weeks ago.

Emphasizing just how unusual this growing season has been, DeWitt notes that the Klicker family has been growing strawberries in the Walla Walla Valley since 1918. They have never begun harvest later than they have this year. There are numerous other anomalies throughout the state. Botrytis has been seen on Syrah for the first time since the grape was planted in Washington in the 1980s. Kent Waliser of Sagemoor Vineyards notes that the order which grapes have been picked has been unusual, with White Riesling coming in ahead of Chardonnay for the first time at Sagemoor’s Weinbau Vineyard on the Wahluke Slope.

Winemaker Ben Smith of Cadence Winery agrees that the vintage has been unusual. “It is unlike any vintage I’ve seen since I started making wine in 1992, although most similar to 1999,” Smith says. “This vintage has featured the lowest ripeness levels I’ve ever seen – we’re probably averaging 24.0 Brix – yet flavors are absolutely mature.”

Despite the late schedule, most winemakers agree that they are excited about the flavors coming from the grapes. Discussing the vintage, DeWitt says, “Compared to other vintages, this year we have very small berries and open grape clusters. I think this is why the flavor development is ahead of what we would expect. Smaller berries will create a higher skin-to-pulp ratio and thus more intense color and flavor. The structural components (acid, sugar, and tannins) are remarkably well balanced. It is going to be a great vintage for boutique wines.”

Warmer sites, such as vineyards on Red Mountain, have already brought in many varieties. Seven Hills Winery, which traditionally picks earlier than many, brought in some of its Red Mountain Cabernet on October 4th. This is a good sign for many of the state’s winemakers that their pick dates for Cabernet, a late ripening varietal, cannot be far off. Still, cooler sites have large amounts of fruit hanging.

Winemaker Dave Butner of Kaella Winery visited Conner Lee Vineyard outside of Othello over the weekend and noted that little of the fruit had been picked yet. “It was very weird to see almost ninety-five percent of the fruit still hanging,” Butner says. Still, Butner was excited about the prospects for the 2010 vintage, saying, “I sampled all my rows of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc. The fruit flavors are fantastic! I think the long season is resulting in spectacular flavor development. Sugars are not up and the acids are still high, but as long as there is no frost I think the 2010 vintage has great promise to produce some fantastic wines.”

Along with the potential arrival of cold weather in some locations, the other main concern at present is the compression of the harvest schedule. Much like last year, multiple grapes will be coming in to wineries at the same time. Vineyard manager Ryan Johnson, who manages multiple sites on Red Mountain, noted that this was the first vintage in his career where he would pick Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Syrah, Viognier, Roussanne, Nebbiolo, and Petit Verdot in same week.

For Washington’s numerous small wineries, large amounts of grapes coming in over short periods of time presents considerable challenges. Butner explains, “All of the grapes will be coming in a short window of time. Problem for us is we do not have the floor space for our shared three wineries. In a normal vintage, the ferments are staggered and when one batch is done fermenting, the next comes in. This year if everything comes in and is fermenting at the same time, we will not have the room for it all.” Shannon Jones of Hestia Cellars echoes both the excitement about the vintage and the concern about the compression of the schedule, saying, “Things are looking nice, great flavors and good acidity. Now, if we only had more space!”

See information on the Washington State Growing Degree Days here.

Monthly forecast for Yakima Valley, Walla Walla Valley, and Mattawa.

* * *

The information in the table below is aggregated from personal correspondence with growers and winemakers, as well as information posted on Twitter and Facebook. It is not intended to be comprehensive but rather is intended as a snapshot of what is going on around the state. If you wish to send data for your grapes or vineyards (or correct any of the information below), please email me at wawinereport@gmail.com, leave a comment here, or leave a comment on the WWR Facebook page.

Pictures courtesy of SYZYGY Wines, Obelisco Estate, Kaella Winery, and Waterbrook respectively.

Winery

Grape

Vineyard

Date

Notes

Yakima Valley

Hard Row to Hoe

Orange Muscat

Lonesome Springs Ranch

9/29

Brix = 25.2

Sleight of Hand

Chardonnay

French Creek

9/30


Brian Carter

Merlot

Olsen Estate

9/30


Sinclair Estates

Chardonnay

Lewis

10/2


21 Cellars

Tempranillo

Elephant Mt

10/2


Cote Bonneville

Merlot

DuBrul

10/2


Sleight of Hand

Merlot

Blackrock

10/7

Just over 24 Brix

Red Mountain

Sleight of Hand

Merlot

Red Mt Vineyard

9/29

26.4 brix, 3.66 pH, and TA around .45.

NA

Merlot

Ciel du Cheval

9/30

Almost done harvesting

NA

Viognier

Syrah

Ciel du Cheval

9/30

Started harvesting

Cooper Wine Co

Merlot

Estate

10/1


Grand Reve

Syrah

Grand Reve Vineyard

10/2


CZ Cellars

Grenache

Red Haven

10/2

27.6 brix, 0.56 acid and 3.33 pH

21 Cellars

Sauv Blanc

Artz

10/2


Col Solare

Merlot

Estate

10/4


Col Solare

Malbec

Estate

10/4


Seven Hills

Cabernet

Klipsun

10/4


Seven Hills

Cabernet

Ciel du Cheval

10/4


Elsom

Merlot

Klipsun

10/5


Obelisco

Cabernet

Estate

TBD

23.5 brix TA 0.67 ph 3.42 10/4

Obelisco

Malbec

Estate

TBD

Malbec 22.6 Brix TA:0.66 ph 3.30 10/4

Walla Walla Valley

SYZYGY

Syrah

Seven Hills

10/2


Sleight of Hand

Merlot

Va Piano

10/5

26.0 Brix, 3.80 pH and .33 TA

Wahluke Slope

Hestia

Merlot

Stone Tree

9/24


Hard Row to Hoe

Merlot

Riverbend

9/29

24.8 Brix

Brian Carter

Tempranillo

Stone Tree

9/30


Kyra

Dolcetto

Purple Sage

10/1


Tildio

Merlot

Weinbau

10/4


Substance

Malbec

Stone Tree

10/4


L’Ecole No. 41

Cabernet

Stone Tree

10/5


Columbia Valley

Rasa Vineyards

Merlot

Dionysus

9/25


Novelty Hill

Chardonnay

Stillwater Creek

9/30


Olympic Cellars

Syrah

Sagemoor

10/1


CZ Cellars

Riesling

Bacchus

10/2

23.7 brix, 0.86 acid, 2.91 pH.

Gorman Winery

Chardonnay

Conner Lee

10/5


L’Ecole No. 41

Chardonnay

Bacchus

10/5


Horse Heaven Hills

Robert Karl

Malbec

McKinley Springs

9/29

Excellent balance & flavor

Robert Karl

Merlot

Andrews HH Ranch

10/1

Excellent balance & flavor

Col Solare

Merlot

Coyote Canyon

10/2


Syncline Wine

Syrah

McKinley Springs

10/4

This may be the finest syrah harvested from these guys yet.

Hestia

Syrah

Andrews Ranch

10/6

Block 12

Robert Karl

Cab Franc

Phinny Hill

10/7


Hestia

Syrah

Andrews Ranch

10/8

Tablas Creek clone

Rattlesnake Hills

NH Vines

Tempranillo

Two Coyote

9/30

26 Brix, 3.3 pH

DiStefano

Sauvignon Blanc

Roza Hills

10/8,9

Brix:23.5 pH:3.20 TA:0.70 its perfect!






Snipes Mountain

NA

Gewurz

Upland

9/29


NA

Syrah

Upland

9/30


NA

Pinot Gris

Upland

10/1

Through 10/4

NA

Grenache

Upland

10/1

26.5+ brix

Rolling Bay

Syrah

Upland

10/2


NA

Chardonnay

Upland

10/4


NA

Syrah

Upland

10/4

Also 10/5, 10/6

NA

Merlot

Upland

10/5


Lake Chelan

Hard Row to Hoe

Orange Muscat

Lake Chelan

9/28

25.2 Brix

Vin du Lac

Gewurztraminer

Michaela's

9/29

Small clusters

Vin du Lac

Sauvignon Blanc

Michaela’s

9/30


Hard Row to Hoe

Pinot Noir

Cortelli Vineyard

10/1

24.8 Brix. 1 week behind last year

Vin du Lac

Pinot Gris

Lehm

10/2


Tildio

Chardonnay

Pinot Gris

Merlot

Syrah

Tempranillo

Estate

TBD

Week of 10/4

| edit post

4 comments

  1. Chris Says:
  2. Continued good reporting Sean, but the 10 day forecasts for Zillah and Prosser show low of 39 on October 11, everything else in the 40's. The City of Yakima forecast has little to do with grapes in the Yakima Valley, and even there the forecast is to bottom out at 31 degrees, not "sub-30". Please stop with the hyperbole, the Perfect Storm did not happen in 2010.

     
  3. Chris, my intention here was not to offer hyperbole but rather to state concerns expressed to me by certain growers and winemakers. This is where the statement regarding the concern about cold (sub-30 degree) weather comes from - not from a personal reading of weather maps.

    Regarding your reference to the possible ‘perfect storm’ I wrote about in a prior post, I believe if you reread today’s post I stated that the cold weather “has led to some concerns about how long the growing season will last. However, the warm temperatures over the last ten days have mitigated many of the concerns that numerous varieties throughout large areas of the state would not reach maturity before freezing temperatures arrived.”

    Thanks for the comment.

     
  4. Anonymous Says:
  5. Strawberies? Harvesting stawberries in October in Washington state, great for us! Merlotman......:) Sean make some wine! :)

     
  6. Chris Says:
  7. Thanks Sean, Sorry for coming off so cranky. I shouldn't comment before coffee.

    I assumed when you linked to a weather site at the end of your article, and labelled it "Yakima Valley", it was meant to support the statement about sub-30 temps in your lede.

     

Post a Comment

Follow

TN Database


Tasting Note Database Read an explanation of the fields here. Last updated 3/7/2014.

WA Wine Books

Blog Archive